Category: betting baseball

betting baseball

Elise Hawkins

Elise Hawkins

Going to horse racing events on Sunday used to be something that only the elite class of society was able to do. It used to be an activity where men would go with their male friends, their wives and sometimes their business associates to enjoy an afternoon of horse racing.
Elise Hawkins

Latest posts by Elise Hawkins (see all)

But one item stood out: In a box of papers in the basement, Barney said, was a spiral notebook filled with handwritten entries.

Outside the Lines tracked down two of the postal inspectors who conducted the raid on Bertolini’s home in 1989 and asked them to review the documents. “It was such a mess. “This is the final piece of the puzzle on a New York betting operation with organized crime. But the boys in New York are about breaking arms and knees.

“The implications for baseball are terrible. The postal inspector’s office in Brooklyn, New York, had received a complaint that a man in Staten Island had failed to return goods to paying customers that he was supposed to have autographed. He refused to give them to us,” Dowd said. Therefore at this point, it’s not appropriate to comment on any specifics.” Bertolini’s lawyer, Nicholas De Feis, said his client is “not interested in speaking to anyone about these issues.”

The two inspectors spotted an item that a complainant said had not been returned. For 26 years, the notebook has remained under court-ordered seal and is currently stored in the National Archives’ New York office, where officials have declined requests to release it publicly.

“I got a call at the place where I was working at the time from my brother, and he says, ‘You should come home.’ He said, ‘There’s a bunch of government people here, and they’re here for you.’ At the time, I think it was Mary Flynn of the postal inspector’s office who got on the phone and said, ‘We’re here,’ and she told me why and so forth. [The mob] had a mortgage on Pete while he was a player and manager.”

Last year, Outside the Lines again applied unsuccessfully for access to the notebook but learned it had been transferred to the National Archives under a civil action titled “United States v. But Dowd never had the kind of documents that could cement that part of his case, especially in the eyes of fans who wanted to see Rose returned to Major League Baseball.

Freelance researcher Liam Quinn contributed to this report. 13, a few days after the undercover house tour and after obtaining a search warrant, they searched Bertolini’s home and found evidence that would lead to numerous convictions. The U.S. It’s impossible to count the exact number of times he bet on baseball games because not every day’s entries are legible.

Rose, through his lawyer, Raymond Genco, issued a statement: “Since we submitted the application earlier this year, we committed to MLB that we would not comment on specific matters relating to reinstatement. To be sure, I’m eager to sit down with [MLB commissioner Rob] Manfred to address my entire history — the good and the bad — and my long personal journey since baseball. Attorney’s Office seeking access to the book. “[Ohio bookie] Ron Peters is a golf pro, so he’s got other occupations. “We didn’t know anything about Bertolini or his connection [to Rose].”

It was immediately clear that the many notations of “PETE” in the pages represented Pete Rose.

The timing for Rose, who played in 72 games in 1986, isn’t great. Attorney’s Office internal memorandum from 2000 that requested the spiral notebook’s transfer said Bertolini’s closed file has “sufficient historical or other value to warrant its continued preservation by the United States Government.” The memorandum listed among its attachments a copy of the notebook, but a copy of the memorandum provided by the National Archives had no attachments and had a section redacted.

In April, Rose repeated his denial, this time on Michael Kay’s ESPN New York 98.7 FM radio show, that he bet on baseball while he was a player. And, of course, [Rose] betting while he was a player.”

Barney sent an agent to drive by the address. The documents go beyond the evidence presented in the 1989 Dowd report that led to Rose’s banishment and provide the first written record that Rose bet while he was still on the field.

“It was a mere ‘failure to render [services]’ complaint,” said Barney, who is now retired. Although the 1989 raid on Bertolini’s house received immediate news coverage, nothing about a betting book became public for five years. He placed his financial interest ahead of the Reds, period.”

o Rose bet heavily on college and professional basketball, losing $15,400 on one day in March. Dowd recently met with MLB CIO and executive vice president of administration John McHale Jr., who is leading Manfred’s review of Rose’s reinstatement request, to walk McHale through his investigation. So Barney and Flynn, posing as a couple looking for a home, called a real estate agent and were given a guided tour of Bertolini’s house. That meeting likely will come sometime after the All-Star break. On Monday morning, MLB officials declined to comment about the notebook.

o In the time covered in the notebook, from March through July, Rose bet on at least one MLB team on 30 different days. “He’s a liar.”

Bats, balls, books and papers were scattered all over. “It reeked of fraud,” Barney said.

“There were numbers and dates and — it was a book for sports betting,” Barney said. After Bertolini pleaded guilty and received a federal prison sentence, Sports Illustrated, The New York Times, ESPN and other news organizations filed freedom of information requests with the U.S. It looked to them as if Bertolini had been signing memorabilia with the forged names of some of the most famous baseball players in history: Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, Duke Snider, Mike Schmidt and Pete Rose.

o But on 21 of the days it’s clear he bet on baseball, he gambled on the Reds, including on games in which he played.

“This does it. The man’s name was Michael Bertolini, and the business he ran out of his home was called Hit King Marketing Inc.

Flynn, who said her first reaction was “Holy mackerel,” said they asked Bertolini about the notebook.

But new documents obtained by Outside the Lines indicate Rose bet extensively on baseball — and on the  Cincinnati Reds — as he racked up the last hits of a record-smashing career in 1986. That gave them probable cause to seek a search warrant.

“Bertolini nails down the connection to organized crime on Long Island and New York. They took any records I had whatsoever, and they took different personal belongings and memorabilia from my home.”

“He wasn’t forthcoming with much information,” she said, “but he did acknowledge to me it was records of bets he made for Pete Rose.”

When the case began, it didn’t look particularly enticing, Barney said. Under MLB Rule 21, “Any player, umpire, or club or league official or employee, who shall bet any sum whatsoever upon any baseball game in connection with which the bettor has a duty to perform shall be declared permanently ineligible.”

The documents obtained by Outside the Lines, which reflect betting records from March through July 1986, show no evidence that Rose, who was a player-manager in 1986, bet against his team. Dowd also had testimony and a recorded phone conversation between Bertolini and another Rose associate, Paul Janszen, that established that Bertolini had placed bets for Rose. They provide a vivid snapshot of how extensive Rose’s betting life was in 1986:. We tried to get them. One Executive Tools Spiral Notebook.” Two small boxes of other items confiscated in the postal raid on Bertolini’s house went too, including autographed baseballs and baseball cards.

o Most bets, regardless of sport, were about $2,000. Postal Inspection Service in October 1989, nearly two months after Rose was declared permanently ineligible by Major League Baseball. That came during his worst week of the four-month span, when he lost $25,500.

On Oct. And that is a very powerful problem,” Dowd said. “I was taken aback.”

For 26 years, Pete Rose has kept to one story: He never bet on baseball while he was a player.

But Rose’s supporters have based part of their case for his reinstatement on his claim that he never bet while he was a player or against his team, saying that sins he committed as a manager shouldn’t diminish what he did as a player.

Bertolini offered his take on the raid during his sentencing hearing in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn six years later (he served 14 months for tax fraud and a concurrent assault sentence):

“The rule says, if you bet, it doesn’t say for or against. There was a for sale sign out front, the agent told him. It’s another device by Pete to try to excuse what he did,” Dowd said. Their authenticity has been verified by two people who took part in the raid, which was part of a mail fraud investigation and unrelated to gambling. This closes the door,” said John Dowd, the former federal prosecutor who led MLB’s investigation.

“I wish I had been able to use it [the book] all those years he was denying he bet on baseball,” said Flynn, the former postal inspector. “Never bet as a player: That’s a fact,” he said.

The documents are copies of pages from a notebook seized from the home of former Rose associate Michael Bertolini during a raid by the U.S. “But when he bet, he was gone. There was stuff everywhere,” Barney said.

Dowd, who reviewed the documents at Outside the Lines’ request, said his investigators had tried but failed to obtain Bertolini’s records, believing they would be the final piece in their case that Rose was betting with mob-connected bookmakers in New York. Both agents, former supervisor Craig Barney and former inspector Mary Flynn, said the records were indeed copies of the notebook they seized.

Yes, he admitted in 2004, after almost 15 years of denials, he had placed bets on baseball, but he insisted it was only as a manager.

In April, Outside the Lines examined the Bertolini memorabilia kept in the National Archives’ New York office, but the betting book — held apart from everything else — was off-limits. Dowd and his team had sworn testimony from bookie Ron Peters that Rose bet on the Reds from 1984 through 1986, but not written documentation. Dowd’s investigation had established that Rose was hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt at the time he was banished from the game.

“We knew that [Bertolini] recorded the bets, and that he bet himself, but we never had his records. In March of this year, he applied to Manfred for reinstatement. The largest single bet was $5,500 on the Boston Celtics, a bet he lost.

Dowd said he wished he’d had the Bertolini notebook in 1989, but he didn’t need it to justify Rose’s banishment. I need to maintain that. All were denied on the grounds that the notebook had been introduced as a grand jury exhibit and contained information “concerning third parties who were not of investigative interest.”

If the accusation was true, it would constitute mail fraud, but the agents had no probable cause to search Bertolini’s house.

To Dowd, one of the most compelling elements of the newly uncovered evidence is that it supports the charge that Rose was betting with mob-connected bookies through Bertolini

Elise Hawkins

Elise Hawkins

Going to horse racing events on Sunday used to be something that only the elite class of society was able to do. It used to be an activity where men would go with their male friends, their wives and sometimes their business associates to enjoy an afternoon of horse racing.
Elise Hawkins

Latest posts by Elise Hawkins (see all)

Then get to pitching and hitting! . It’s the only wiffle ball bat you need, no matter kid or adult. But again, it adds to the play risk. Really, it’s the same as the baseball variation above, but you can get someone out through a well-aimed throw at the runner.

I also prefer the nine-inch balls to the twelve-inch wiffle balls. This is a game that works just as well at a group picnic or an empty basketball court, as it does in your own backyard. 

Well, simply put–it’s like baseball but with a hollow plastic bat and plastic balls made with unique (and often oblong) holes. Here are a few, but feel free to make up your own house rules, too:

There are three outs per side. If there are more than two players, you can place one person in each designated marker area. Outs are scored by striking out, a defender catching a fly in fair or foul territory, but with a ground ball, there needs to be a tag or a force out (touch a base before a runner who is forced to move gets to it, due to a hit). 

This is a great way for a small team (even two people) to play a base running version of the game. A double or triple will clear the bases. But if you love softball, the twelve-inch varieties are your best bet. 

The wiffle ball bat

The original yellow plastic bat is a classic. Wiffle ball equipment is more like plastic lightweight toys in comparison.

It’s great baseball or softball training: If your child has shown interest in these sports, wiffle ball is a great low impact place to start. 

The equipment you need

As mentioned, it’s pretty cheap to get a wiffle ball set up going. They can’t leave that area, but they can snag any balls in it. Here you’ll learn the basics of what you need to know (and have) to get a good game of wiffle ball going. 

Just for kicks

Technically you don’t need to have any ruled game surrounding your play time. Set up foul lines, a strike zone (a piece of marked cardboard can help), and field markers for a single, double, triple, and home run. Other variations have holes covering the entire ball, and often the holes are a perfectly circular shape. It gives the game a little more organized feel, and they’re really not that pricey of an accessory for the value they bring.

Game variations

There are quite a few ways to play a game of wiffle ball. They are easier for kids to hold and throw, and they are a bit more challenging to hit. I had a few wiffle balls to the head in my day, though I should say I think I’m pretty ok from it.

When one on one, you’ve got the entire field as the defender. And when hit in the air, they can take some unusual twists and turns. 

It’s pretty safe for young ones: Baseballs and baseball bats can be dangerous in young hands. A single gets a runner on base. All you need is some basic equipment and you are set!

Wiffle balls

I’m a fan of the original wiffle balls, though there are variations out there. I suggest fifteen feet per each of these markers, starting from home plate. If you can catch up to a fly ball (in fair or foul territory) or a moving ground ball in fair territory, you can snag it for an out, no matter where on the field. If you’ve got young baseball fans in the family, this is a great game to share with them.

You can play at a moments notice: No need for finding gloves and protective gear, getting a team together, and getting to a field. 

You can play in the country or in a more urban setting: Wiffle balls and bats were designed to make sure the balls don’t travel too far when hit or pitched. I’ve found that the original balls allow for more spin and tricks with the ball when pitching, and it does more interesting things in the air when hit. If you don’t like the idea of your kids throwing wiffle balls at someone running the bases, just ignore this one. A home run is, well, a home run. Pitch the ball, hit the ball, move runners forward, and get the batter out. There are lots of ways to play (well beyond the official rules), it’s cheap to set up, and, perhaps most importantly, it’s an outside game so everyone can enjoy the beautiful sunny weather. Essentially you are moving imaginary runners around the diamond. Foul tips are strikes, except for the third strike (just like in baseball), and balls that aren’t swung at, but hit your strike marker are strikes as well. 

The offical (or close to it) wiffle ball game

This is great for two players, but there can be as many as five per team. It’s light, easy to swing, and durable. If you can hit the runner in the torso area (no head, no legs) while the runner is circling the bases, then the runner is out. 

Easy to set up. But, my friends and I loved this variation when we were kids. The fact that you can pick up and play just about anywhere adds to it too. Plus, who doesn’t love the bright, fun color? It just feels like summer. 

Throw down bases

While not a necessity (you can use landmarks, stones, and other natural markers), many people like using throw down bases. For most wiffle ball game variations, you have the exact same goals as in baseball. It can be a lot of fun (and great baseball and softball training) just to throw the ball, swing the bat, and field without keeping score. Your child could even play on his or her own using a wiffle ball machine like the one below.

The “it’s just like baseball” variation

You score runs by getting a clean hit that lands (and stops) in one of the marked areas. Easy to play. But of course, no person can be passed the home run marker, unless you’re just a family onlooker cheering on the game!

The thrown ball tag variation

What is wiffle ball?

This one is not for everyone. In fact, as far as summer games for kids go, I’d say this one ranks up there in terms of fun, exercise, and family-bonding potential. You field a team, you run the bases, and you score runs. There is no running of the bases, only pitching, hitting, and outs. It’s great for getting summer time exercise for the kids. These balls have oblong holes going around the top of the ball only. There are no walks as wiffle balls can be tough to control. 

What makes wiffle ball special?

Why not just play baseball or softball you may be asking? Those can be fun summer games for kids too, but there’s a lot of cool things about wiffle ball that place it in a class all its own. 

A lot of warm weather good times to be had

So if you’re considering your options for cool summer games for kids around your neighborhood, here’s a vote for giving wiffle ball a shot. A double will move an imaginary runner on first to third. Proceed with caution. And a whole lot of fun!

When I was a child, there was no game I loved more than wiffle ball. The title says it all. Plus, the balls are hollow and light, so it’s nearly impossible for them to do major damage to things they hit.

A game can work with two people or eighteen people: This is a summer kid’s game that can be just as fun one-on-one as against a team. 

The balls are fun to throw, hit, and catch: The holes in the balls allow you to throw some amazing “junk” pitches with lots of curves and sliding action. It’ll also score any runners already on second or third. It’s got so much going for it between the family and team bonding opportunities, the skill learning, and ultimately just the fun of throwing, fielding, and batting these crazy balls. Outs are earned by striking out, catching a ball in the air, or grabbing a ground ball while it’s still in motion

Elise Hawkins

Elise Hawkins

Going to horse racing events on Sunday used to be something that only the elite class of society was able to do. It used to be an activity where men would go with their male friends, their wives and sometimes their business associates to enjoy an afternoon of horse racing.
Elise Hawkins

Latest posts by Elise Hawkins (see all)

Making it more difficult for sports bettors is that some sports services will claim to have won 200 units in a particular sport, but don’t mention that they release 10- or 20-unit plays, along with several 100-unit “locks” at the end of the year if things aren’t going so well and they need something to base next year’s advertising on.

For the bettors that do their own handicapping, however, units won is really the only thing you should be concerned with, as that ultimately is going to translate into the bottom line. In the question above, it would be much better to be a 55-percent handicapper if you were playing 150 games a month, as opposed to a 60-percent handicapper playing one game a day. A winning percentage of 55-percent sure doesn’t sound as sexy as a 60-percent handicapper, but if your volume of plays is high enough, it can certainly be much more profitable.

With baseball season coming back in about 4 months, many sports gamblers will be seeing ads from different sports services claiming winning percentages of 65-percent for baseball, and that’s entirely possibly, but what the services aren’t saying is that the majority of their selections were favorites of -200 or more, turning that 65-percent handicapping into a losing proposition.

If somebody were to ask you if you would rather be a 60-percent handicapper or a 55-percent handicapper, which would you choose? The obvious answer is that it’s better to be a 60-percent handicapper, but that isn’t necessarily true.

The only statistic that sports bettors should be concerned with is units won, which is the amount of profit, or loss, they have over time, and not worry nearly as much about winning percentage. And as is the case with the Arkansas-based giant, many times this will be more profitable than being extremely selective and doing a small amount of volume, even if the mark-up is higher.. At the end of the month, the 55-percent handicapper would have gone 83-67 for a gain of 9.3 units, while the 60-percent handicapper would have gone 18-12 for a profit of 4.8 units, so the 55-percent handicapper has made nearly twice as much.

The 55-percent handicapper is using what is commonly referred to as the Wal-Mart Approach, which is to have a lot of volume with the expectation of grinding out a small profit